Review: Not enough evidence for 9/11-related cancer

Sept. 11 first responders who later developed cancer will not have their medical bills covered under the new Zadroga bill, which provides health care for

BROOKLYN - Sept. 11 first responders who later developed cancer will not have their medical bills covered under the new Zadroga bill, which provides health care for those who became sick while working around Ground Zero.

Officials at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health say there isn't enough evidence to link cancer to the cleanup at Ground Zero.

Organizations such as Friends of Firefighters in Red Hook say they are outraged by the outcome of the review.

The review is only the first of a series of investigations into the link between exposure to toxins at Ground Zero and cancer. A new study is under way which may prove a connection, but the results are not expected until 2012, according to officials.

Sen. Kristen Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) said the wait is too long and those heroes who worked so hard should not have to continue to suffer.

Congress passes aid package for 9/11 responders News conference on Senate's passage of 9/11 health billSenate set to hold key test vote on 9/11 health care bill

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