Correction: Interior-National Monuments story

Posted: Updated:
(Scott G Winterton/The Deseret News via AP, File). FILE - In this May 9, 2017, file photo, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke rides a horse in the new Bears Ears National Monument near Blanding, Utah. Zinke on Monday, June 12, 2017, recommended that the new... (Scott G Winterton/The Deseret News via AP, File). FILE - In this May 9, 2017, file photo, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke rides a horse in the new Bears Ears National Monument near Blanding, Utah. Zinke on Monday, June 12, 2017, recommended that the new...
(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster). In this photo taken April 26, 2017, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks at the Interior Department in Washington. Ryan Zinke is recommending that the new Bears Ears National Monument in Utah be reduced in size and says Congr... (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster). In this photo taken April 26, 2017, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks at the Interior Department in Washington. Ryan Zinke is recommending that the new Bears Ears National Monument in Utah be reduced in size and says Congr...
(AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File). FILE - In this June 22, 2016 file photo, the "House on Fire" ruins in Mule Canyon in Bears Ears National Monument near Blanding, Utah.  Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is recommending that the new Bears Ears National Monumen... (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File). FILE - In this June 22, 2016 file photo, the "House on Fire" ruins in Mule Canyon in Bears Ears National Monument near Blanding, Utah. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is recommending that the new Bears Ears National Monumen...

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - In a story June 13 about the national monuments review, The Associated Press reported erroneously the year the Antiquities Act was passed. It was enacted in 1906, not 1908.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Utah national monument recommendation spurs action

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's recommendation to downsize a vast new national monument in Utah created optimism among opponents of other monuments under review around the country

By BRADY McCOMBS

Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's recommendation to downsize a vast new national monument in Utah created optimism among opponents of 26 other monuments under review around the country and fear among conservation groups that worry he will propose shrinking or rescinding other sites in his final report due in late August.

Along the New England coast, commercial fishermen were ecstatic to hear Monday about Zinke's proposed reduction of the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah and hopeful it foreshadows a similar fate for a marine monument they oppose.

They're preparing to make a pitch for a full undoing of the designation when Zinke visits the area later this week.

Opponents of other sites are making similar plans after the Bears Ears decision, saying the designations often close areas to oil, gas and mineral development along with other uses.

"It sets a precedent for the review of all the monuments," said Beth Casoni, executive director of the Massachusetts Lobstermen's Association Inc. "Under the former administration, we questioned whether this is about conservation or just control."

Conservation groups that were stung by the recommendation are trying to rally public support to fully preserve the monuments but expect they will have to resort to a protracted legal fight if President Donald Trump eventually downsizes or eliminates monument designations.

They assert the 1906 Antiquities Act allows presidents to create monuments but only gives Congress the power to modify or rescind them.

"It's obvious the goal is to serve private interests over the public good," said Kristen Boyles, a staff attorney with the environmental group Earthjustice.

As Zinke gets ready to visit the Katahdin Wood and Waters Monument in Maine, people on both sides of the issue are dissecting his Bears Ears proposal.

Demar Dahl, an Elko County commissioner in Nevada, said he expects Zinke will take the same shrink-but-not-rescind approach with two Nevada monuments under review- Basin and Range, and Gold Butte.

"I don't have the problem with things being protected that need to be protected, but when you set aside maybe 10 times more area than you need that's when you get to the point when you need common sense to kick in," Dahl said.

Zinke called the Bears Ears area "drop-dead gorgeous country" that merits some protection on Monday in explaining his recommendation, but said the boundaries should be more narrowly focused around key cultural sites.

President Donald Trump ordered the monument review based on the notion that presidents increasingly are protecting areas that are too large and do not fit the law's purpose of shielding particular historical or archaeological sites.

National monument designations add protections for lands revered for their natural beauty and historical significance with the goal of preserving them for future generations.

The restrictions aren't as stringent as national parks, but some policies include limits on mining, timber cutting and recreational activities such as riding off-road vehicles.

Many national monuments have later been declared national parks. Among them were Zion National Park in Utah and Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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