Psychiatrist: Seasonal affective disorder common at this time of year

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The days are shorter, the colder weather is here, and that could have some people feeling down.

A psychiatrist at St. Barnabas Hospital says that seasonal affective disorder is very common at this time of year. The change in temperature could, in fact, change your mood. "Seasonal affective disorder is a disorder in which people experience symptoms similar to the symptoms you experience during depression," said psychiatrist Pablo Ibanez.

That includes low mood, feeling down, low energy or drive. Ibanez says these symptoms happen mostly during fall and winter.

"Women are more likely to get seasonal affective disorder and people that are younger are more likely to get seasonal affective disorder," said Ibanez.

So if you feel it coming on, what can you do to stop it? When inside, make sure you are letting more light in.

Also, know that you are not alone. According to the American Psychiatric Association, about 5% of adults in the US experience the disorder.

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