Audit deems many NYC subway stations inaccessible for disabled

<p>A new report by the NYC comptroller calls the New York City subway system largely inaccessible for the elderly, people with young children and people with disabilities.&nbsp;</p>

News 12 Staff

Jul 17, 2018, 9:20 PM

Updated 2,100 days ago

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A new report by the NYC comptroller calls the New York City subway system largely inaccessible for the elderly, people with young children and people with disabilities.
Sixty-two of the 122 New York City neighborhoods served by the subway system do not have a single accessible station, according to Comptroller Scott Stringer’s report, “Service Denied: Accessibility and the New York City Subway System.”
The report found that 51 percent of neighborhoods with subway stations had no accessible stations at all.
Brooklyn, which is reported to have the most neighborhoods served by the subway, also was found to have the highest percentage of inaccessible stations, followed by the Bronx.
The MTA has since responded to the report, releasing a statement that reads: "New York City Transit has never been more committed to an accessible transit system than it is right now. President Byford has hired the system's first-ever accessibility chief, and his Fast Forward plan includes a roadmap to dramatically expand subway accessibility, with customers no more than two stations away from an accessible station within five years and continued elevator installations after that."
The report does include information about the Fast Forward plan, but notes that the upgrades included in the plan are dependent upon external funding. 


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