Black Maternal Health Week: Mother discusses how her pregnancy inspired her to become a doctor

This week is Black Maternal Health Week, where people dedicate time to recognize the struggles and disparities women of color often face throughout their pregnancy process.

Mary-Lyn Buckley and Adolfo Carrion

Apr 15, 2024, 9:56 PM

Updated 37 days ago

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A doctor says she went to medical school to become the obstetrician-gynecologist (OBGYN) she wishes she had during her pregnancy.
This week is Black Maternal Health Week, where people dedicate time to recognize the struggles and disparities women of color often face throughout their pregnancy process and even post-partum.
“I had a premature delivery, I had pre-eclampsia, I had to have surgeries while I was pregnant, and having gone through all those complications it was important to have a lot of support,” said Dr. Sophia Lubin. “I realized, women would need someone to depend on and turn to and who would listen to them.”
Lubin is a Black woman who says her birthing experience inspired her to pursue her medical career. She says Black women are three to four times more likely to face complications compared to white women, including maternal mortality.
“Implicit and explicit bias. The fact that historically, Black people have been taken advantage of in the medical system and that leads to a lot of mistrust,” said Lubin.
A Brooklyn Heights mother and woman of color, Tracy Ann Desmond, says she lost her first child during delivery a few years ago.
“During the pregnancy, I ended up with depression and, I am still depressed after what happened,” said Desmond. “Make sure the doctor is listening and make sure you are being taken care of.”


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