HEAT ALERT

Relentless heat lingers through the weekend in Brooklyn; possible pop-up thunderstorms

Melaquain Anderson's family walks during commencement to receive posthumous degree

Mothers who also lost their child or loved one to a tragedy received an honor for carrying on their legacy from Assemblymember Phara Souffrant Forrest.

Daniella Rodriguez

May 29, 2024, 2:49 AM

Updated 24 days ago

Share:

Michelle Barnes-Anderson has fought a six-year battle to get Mel's Law passed to ensure credits be waived for posthumous degrees.
The bill was signed into law on Oct. 25, 2023, the six-year anniversary of Melquain Anderson's death. It allows SUNY and CUNY schools to waive remaining credits for posthumous degrees awarded to students after death.
Anderson's father and daughter walked the stage on Tuesday and got his posthumous degree from John Jay College.
"At one point, I’m so excited and I’m so happy like look at my son," said Barnes-Anderson. "'I did it for you. You couldn’t be an attorney, but I made you a law and you got that degree’ but then it’s all like to hearing the cheers in the confetti going, and he’s not a part of it.”
Mothers who also lost their child or loved one to a tragedy received an honor for carrying on their legacy from Assemblymember Phara Souffrant Forrest.
“Thank you for showing up," said Assemblymember Souffrant-Forrest. "Understand that when you show up, you leave your house, you leave your inner circle and you come not necessarily to share the pain, but to show the hope of what your child represents.”
Barnes-Anderson told News 12 Mel's Law has become her new purpose as a mother.


More from News 12