Bronx DA, religious leaders rally to denounce rash of hate crimes in NYC

District Attorney Darcell Clark, along with countless elected officials, community and religious leaders from the Asian, Jewish, Muslim and Christian faiths came together to denounce hate in the city after a wave of vicious hate crimes.

News 12 Staff

May 21, 2021, 9:58 PM

Updated 1,120 days ago

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The Bronx District Attorney's Office hosted a rally against hate at Lou Gehrig plaza in Concourse Village Friday.
District Attorney Darcell Clark, along with countless elected officials, community and religious leaders from the Asian, Jewish, Muslim and Christian faiths came together to denounce hate in the city after a wave of vicious hate crimes.
Clark and other leaders spoke out against the recent synagogue attacks in Riverdale, mosque vandalism in Brooklyn and the series of anti-Asian assaults and crimes throughout the city, saying it has to stop.
Demonstrators said these communities need whole-hearted support, especially during Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month and American Jewish Heritage Month.
"We're not talking about COVID-19, we're talking about the virus of racism that infects our world today," said Yang Chen, executive director of the Asian American Bar Association New York.
"It's not just Jewish residents, it's not just Asian residents, the hate, the discrimination against other communities as well has been going on has been going on for far too long," said Bronx Assemblymember Jeffrey Dinowitz.
Clark said people are being targeted for their identity, race and religion.
The groups stood together in solidarity and said these acts of hate will not be tolerated.
"It's pure hate and we're here to show everyone that's not who we are as Bronxites, it's not who we are as New Yorkers and we will not stand for it," Clark said. "Hate against one of us is hate against all of us."
There was also a resource fair before and after the event with the Clark's office.
The Asian American Federation, the Human Rights Commission and others handed out signs and buttons that read "Stop hate now" and "One humanity against the virus," in efforts to educate people on hate crimes.


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