Brooklyn program becomes chosen family for transgender, non-binary community

Guiding and helping others survive transition is the mission of Brooklyn GHOST Project. It has been helping TGNCI people of color for seven years, but it prides itself on a new program.

News 12 Staff

Jun 7, 2021, 2:14 PM

Updated 1,103 days ago

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Going through the transition process can be difficult for members of the transgender, gender-non-conforming and intersex community. Advocates say many people don't have family support as they go through it.
Guiding and helping others survive transition is the mission of Brooklyn GHOST Project. It has been helping TGNCI people of color for seven years, but it prides itself on a new program.
"The S.O.O.L program - saving our own lives," Latravious Collins.
Kylexus White was having a hard time while living in Florida. She moved to Brooklyn when she learned of the initiative.
"So, I could better my life because I was on drugs and stuff. I came up here, got sober and they helped me start my business, Kylexus Kitchen," says White.
Through the program, White made her dream come true - getting her soul food catering business off the ground. The staff helps provide food and items, like makeup.
"Our motto is when you come into the S.O.O.L program, you never leave empty-handed," Latravious Collins, of Brooklyn GHOST Project.
Collins says material items are helpful, but most are in need of something money can't buy.
"So many people in the community feel unloved, unwanted and unaccepted. Acceptance is like a drug, it's a power that people can hold over you and when people are not being accepted or they feel unaccepted, they tend to act out and lose sight of the most valuable things," says Collins.
Members believe this service is critical.
"A lot of our youth need that real tough, genuine caring love. Loyal love," says Sasha Washington, of Bedford-Stuyvesant.
The program helps fill a deep void.
"I think the program, if it ever leaves here, I think people wouldn't know what to do," says Ejira Moore, of East Flatbush.
The group meets every Wednesday at the Brooklyn Community Pride Center.


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