Brownsville Recreation Center to be rebuilt with $160 million investment

The project stalled after crews uncovered significant damage and deterioration severe enough to require the buildings be demolished and rebuilt.

Nadia Galindo

Jul 11, 2024, 2:50 AM

Updated 13 days ago

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The Brownsville Recreation Center (BRC) just got major funding to demolish and rebuild the aging infrastructure.
Mayor Eric Adams and NYC Parks Commissioner Sue Donoghue joined local leaders to announce a $160 million investment in the BRC. The funding was included in the city's 2025 2025 fiscal year budget.
The funding comes as four of the complex's five buildings sit idle after a renovation project stalled in November.
The project stalled after crews uncovered significant damage and deterioration severe enough to require the buildings be demolished and rebuilt.
"People thought we were going to walk away and we were clear we were not," said Mayor Adams. "We know what this center means and I know there were so many years of broken promises."
Right now, summer programs for children, adults and seniors are being conducted in the remaining building that is open and outdoors in the adjoining field and basketball courts.
Local leaders, like Councilmember Chris Banks, who represents District 42, which includes Brownsville, celebrated the new funding and called the BRC vital to the community and part of the solution to curb crime and gun violence.
"Take folks off the street and get them to exercise their minds build up themselves, and I believe this is the space where this can happen," he said.
Dorothy Vasquez and Alma Houston were among the community members who attended the press conference for the funding announcement and left with questions and concerns.
"Where are we going in the meantime, ya know? Thats what I want to know," said Vasquez.
"You cant have a community with the needs that Brownsville has and have whole population of kids without organized recreation," said Houston.
NYC Parks Commissioner Sue Donoghue said there are plans to ensure there is a space for recreational activities and programs to continue throughout the project.
"We are already looking at alternative locations where we can have recreation, where we can replace the recreation that is happening here that's close by during the period when this is closed," she said.
There is no set timeline on when the project will start.
The next step is to gather community input.
Follow the progress of the project through Community Board 16 and through the Parks Department website.


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