Likelihood of hot car deaths increases as New York City sees hottest week of the year so far

About 38 kids die in a hot car every year, according to Kids and Car Safety.

Shniece Archer

Jun 20, 2024, 2:53 AM

Updated 33 days ago

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New York City has seen one of the hottest weeks heading into the summer, and according to experts, that means the likelihood of hot car deaths are increasing.
About 38 kids die in a hot car every year, according to Kids and Car Safety.
"There is no safe amount of time that you can leave a child alone in a vehicle. In the matter of minutes, the inside of a car can heat up to deadly temperatures because of the greenhouse effect," said Susan Auriemma, vice president of Kids and Car Safety.
Experts tell News 12 there's usually three different scenarios that can lead to a child dying.
"In 25% of the cases, it's children have gotten in on their own and were unable to get out," said Auriemma.\In about two thirds of cases, sometimes the parents leave the child in the car by accident and sometimes in 10% of the cases, parents leave their child thinking that it's OK for a few minutes, according to Kids and Car Safety.
"There's a misconception that people think only horrible parents leave their child in a car. It's not that the parent has made a choice to be distracted but are brains are asked to do more", said Auriemma.
Some parents says that even when they're driving with the air conditioning on, sometimes the sun just takes over, but they try to find ways to keep their kids cool in the car and outside.
"Have access to shaded areas. I think that's important to take breaks, don't have kids stressed, do too much...you want to give them frequent breaks," said Bryant Brown, a parent in Brooklyn.
Experts also said you can make sure your child is dressed appropriately when riding in the back seat.
"That car seat itself is insulation, so make sure your child is not over dressed and it's important to remember that even on the day that's not very hot a child can die from a heat stroke," said Auriemma.
Experts say those heading out with their kids should make sure they’re wearing sunscreen, staying hydrated and carry water.


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